ADHD in the classroom: How schools are keeping kids focused

ADHD in the classroom: How schools are keeping kids focused
Individualized approaches to learning and attention at home can put children with ADHD on a path for success according to Dr. Idell.
Individualized approaches to learning and attention at home can put children with ADHD on a path for success according to Dr. Idell.

EAST TEXAS (KLTV) - School is back in session, and one of the most talked about items in the school clinic is Attention Deficit and Hyper Activity Disorder.

Teachers, nurses, and parents are all searching for ways to keep students on task and successful this school year.
 
"Twitches staring blankly, these are serious side effects that need to be sent to the nurse right away," Tyler ISD nurse Cynthia Baker said are just some things teachers and campus nurses have to watch for in kids with ADHD.
 
she adds even though the diagnosed numbers of ADHD kids in Tyler schools might be on the decline, there are still as many as a few hundred that seek medication while attending school. UT Health Northeast psychiatrist Richard Idell explains what impact the disorder could have in the classroom.
 
"Falling behind in their classes developmentally, more often being held back or having to get tutoring services, they can be very disruptive not intentionally in the classroom but can be very disruptive to other students," Idell said.
 
Idell adds behavioral interventions like rewarding kids for good behavior aren't a substitution for medication, but is another way to reduce distractions that could trigger outbursts. Baker said communication between the school, family, and doctor are critical for making sure ADHD patients have the proper dose.
 
"We try to get the medication give before they come to school and then at lunch time that gives us a good indicator when they come in for their second dose we can see how they're doing off their first dose," Baker said.
 
According to Idell, taking an individual approach both at home and in school can help put children with ADHD on a path for success.
 
"A smaller classroom size, more individual attention, less distraction and these kids can really flourish when they're in the right setting," Idell said.

Since diagnosing ADHD has changed recently, Baker said it could show less students having the disorder even though symptoms may be present.


Copyright 2015 KLTV. All rights reserved.