East Texas couple shares tips on how to raise hens for eggs

“We just wanted to raise better food for our family than we could buy; we wanted to know what our chickens were being fed and that they were being raised humanely,” Shane said.
East Texas couple shares tips on how to raise hens for eggs
Published: Jan. 20, 2023 at 10:30 PM CST|Updated: Jan. 20, 2023 at 10:55 PM CST
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TYLER, Texas (KLTV) - The rising cost of eggs has inspired East Texans to become curious about how to raise their own hens according to local farmers at Taste and See Farm in Tyler.

Shane and Stephanie Shelton are the owners of Taste and See Farm, and they say there has been an uptick in people buying eggs from them.

“Inflation and bird flu, I mean, those industrial raised chickens are packed in tight in cages and they’re not in the sunlight. They’re not eating all of the bugs and grass and stuff that gives them vitamins to stay healthy, you know,” says Shane.

They started their farm two years ago.

“We just wanted to raise better food for our family than we could buy; we wanted to know what our chickens were being fed and that they were being raised humanely,” Shane said.

Ever since the cost of eggs has risen, they said they have noticed an increase in people buying eggs locally, through a Facebook group called Tyler Farm to Table, where eggs can be purchased online, and picked up on Saturdays in Tyler.

“Everybody’s seen a big increase, and we’ve also seen a big increase in people joining that group looking for pasteurized egg ... or some of them just any egg,” said Shane.

Shane says people are starting to notice how much better locally grown free range eggs taste than pasteurized eggs.

They sell their eggs for $6.50 a dozen and recommend that anyone wanting to produce their own eggs to start with either chicks or pullets, a hen under 1 year old.

“Definitely get into going to Tractor Supply or Atwoods and getting some chicks. It’s fun, kids love it, but I mean pullets are kind of an easier way to get started,” said Shane.

Shane also recommends getting them a hen house, nesting boxes, and then wait for your first eggs.