Courage, Commitment, Honor: 81st Anniversary of Pearl Harbor remembered in East Texas

Bynum says the reason for the attack was due to Japan seeking world power.
Courage, Commitment, Honor: 81st Anniversary of Pearl Harbor remembered in East Texas
Published: Dec. 7, 2022 at 8:08 PM CST|Updated: Dec. 7, 2022 at 8:33 PM CST
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TYLER, Texas (KLTV) - Each year on December 7, Pearl Harbor survivors, veterans, and community members from all over the world come together to remember and honor those who were killed during The Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.

Americans across the nation are celebrating and honoring those who lost their lives during the sudden attack.

“It was a day, as President Roosevelt said, that would live in infamy, and we do remember this day, but we remember this day for the courage, and the commitment, and the honor of the men that were killed,” said Robin Bynum, curriculum coordinator for the American Freedom Museum.

Bynum says the reason for the attack was due to Japan seeking world power.

“There was a belief that in America behind every blade of grass there was a weapon and so they choose not to attack us by land but to attack us by sea,” said Bynum.

Brothers Joe and James Fritcher were on the same battleship during the attack.

A telegraph was sent to their homes saying that they died. It was later discovered that both brothers jumped off opposite ends of the battleship they were on. The brothers were eventually reunited and went on to serve their country for the rest of World War II.

“It really created the military that you see today as far as the highly trained, the highly skilled, and the highly equipped military force that we have today,” said Travis Gladhill, executive director of Camp V.

“Pearl Harbor and World War II can be attributed to helping pull United States out of the Great Depression because it created jobs that didn’t exist before,” said Gladhill.

Bynum says that the men who died in the Pearl Harbor attack teach Americans who come after them valuable lessons.

“Putting others first, being men and woman of our word, being unified and moving forward in history, seeking that freedom for ourselves and others,” said Bynum.