NWS survey finds 100 mph straight line winds caused Tyler storm damage

Powerful winds toppled trees into homes in Tyler's Azalea District neighborhood on Tuesday.
Powerful winds toppled trees into homes in Tyler's Azalea District neighborhood on Tuesday.(Lane Luckie/KLTV staff)
Published: Apr. 15, 2022 at 5:38 AM CDT

TYLER, Texas (KLTV) - Straight line winds estimated at 100 miles per hour caused the damage in Tyler during Tuesday’s severe weather, a National Weather Service survey shows.

The report, released Thursday evening after meteorologists surveyed damage in the city earlier in the day, found a prolonged period of high winds began around 8:03 p.m. that night.

A squall line of severe thunderstorms produced a 1.1 mile path of damage in Tyler’s historic Azalea District, toppling mature hardwood trees and tearing down power lines in several neighborhoods.

Uprooted trees falling in a northeasterly direction were the primary indicators of the intensity of the storms, the report stated.

On Wednesday, City of Tyler work crews removed fallen trees and limbs blocking more than 90 streets in the area.

ADDITIONAL SURVEY

Meteorologists from the NWS Shreveport Forecast Office also surveyed damage in the Warren City area of Gregg County on Thursday.

Their report concluded hardwood and softwood tree trunks were snapped after a downburst, followed

Reports of damage, including a metal farm building, were primarily found in the area of Texas Street and George Richey Road.

Winds in the area were estimated at 95 miles per hour, the report indicated.

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