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Amarillo’s first female Eagle Scouts make history

We recognize their accomplishments.
In February of 2019, the Boy Scouts of America opened the organization up to females. 
When...
In February of 2019, the Boy Scouts of America opened the organization up to females. When Hope Ennis and Ainsley Mason heard the news, they immediately started working to earn the Eagle Scout Rank.(KFDA)
Updated: Feb. 8, 2021 at 6:16 PM CST
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AMARILLO, Texas (KFDA) - In February of 2019, the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) opened the organization up to females.

Since then, girls ages 11 through 17 have had the chance to achieve the eagle scout rank.

When Hope Ennis and Ainsley Mason heard the news, they immediately started working to earn the Eagle Scout rank. It took them almost two years to achieve it.

According to their scout master, on average it takes a member about five years to accomplish this goal since it requires a lot of time, dedication and drive.

“I think it’s good to acknowledge it and say what a wonderful job they’ve done. It’s hard to be the first at anything. They have both shown that they are very driven. They had a very short timeline to make this inaugural class and they both made it,” said Rebecca Holcomb, Scout Master of Troop 4086 in Amarillo.

On average, only about six percent of all members make it to an Eagle Scout, and then it has to be completed before the member turns 18. The fastest you can become an Eagle Scout is in 18 months.

“Not all scouts earn the rank of Eagle Scout because it does require a lot of time and effort and not everybody makes it to that,” said Holcomb.

Each scout has to accomplish a big community project as one of their tasks.

15-year-old Ennis collected paper towels and laundry detergent for the women’s Shelter, Martha’s Home in Amarillo and 18-year-old Mason planted a raised garden bed for Saint Paul United Methodist Church.

“Some of the challenges just leading up to being able to do anything was getting some of the merit badges. So, some of the merit badges are a little harder, they require a period of time you need to document stuff such as the physical fitness or the cooking merit badge. So, I know that I’ve done a lot of the stuff that’s required, but the problem is the documentation for me,” Lauren (Ainsley) Mason, Troop 4086 Eagle Scout in Amarillo.

“I think it’s a really cool experience being able to experience the first one, but also showing other younger girls that you can do it. And it’s not easy but there’s a possibly for them to do it and having them have a role model of seeing how you do it, like how me and Ainsley did it, and having that path kind of for them,” said Hope Ennis, Troop 4086 Eagle Scout in Amarillo.

Mason will now move on to junior assistant scout master and Ennis will continue on as a chaplain’s aid with the troop.

They will also both move into the venturing crew which is a co-ed group of scouting.

This weekend, the girls will have their court of honor to celebrate the achievement.

On February 21, the National BSA plans to have an online recognition for all of the inaugural female Eagle Scouts.

You can find their Facebook page here for more information and check out their website for additional details.

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