Marion County seals time capsule in cornerstone of historic courthouse

Marion County seals time capsule in cornerstone of historic courthouse
Marion County seals time capsule in cornerstone of historic courthouse

MARION COUNTY, Texas (KLTV) - Marion County is giving a little something to the future in the form of a time capsule. A little over a year ago they opened the one set in place in 1913. And now with the Marion County Courthouse renovations nearly complete county officials have placed a new capsule behind the cornerstone.

WEBXTRA: Marion County seals time capsule in cornerstone of historic courthouse

The capsule isn’t huge, but it needs to fit behind a cornerstone at the Marion County Courthouse. County Judge Leward LaFleur has gathered items donated by Marion County residents to place in the time cylinder.

“This was Judge Loomis who was county judge when the courthouse was built,” Lafleur said.

There were several photographs and coins, including a 2020 minted quarter featuring bats, and some older items as well.

“This was the straight razor from Commissioner George Washington Brown who was a county commissioner when they actually built the courthouse originally in 1913,” LaFluer

The items filled the judge’s desk, and would easily fill the time capsule. And since there was local honey going in, there had to be a nut, or at least a nut-like seed.

“And a buckeye from Potter’s Point on the east side of the county,” Lafleur said.

Then suddenly Marsha Thomas, great granddaughter of Commissioner Brown himself appeared with another capsule donation, a photograph of Hira Johnson, a commissioner back in 1913. The photos had been a challenge.

“Well I did run down the great granddaughter of Judge Loomis, and she says nobody’s got a picture. And I said what there’s got to be a picture. But at any rate she found one finally, and I later found one also,” Thomas said.

So the judge made the cut. A small group gathered to witness the placement of the capsule and its contents, which, of course were documented.

“We put everything in the official public records of Marion County and made sure that it was notated,” Lafleur said.

Before it was sealed, those present were asked to sign the capsule. It took three people to carry in the corner stone. Then the official filling of the tube began, and it really took no time at all.

The capsule was put in the base of the courthouse, and with phones clicking away; the stone was placed in front of it.

“Well, I think it went very well,” Lafleur said.

And he believes the contents should fare very well, lasting at least as long as the new courthouse renovations. Time will tell.

There is no date set for the opening of the time capsule. The judge has left that up to courts of the future to decide how long is long enough.

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