Required high school civics questions to be added to current U.S. history exam

House Bill 1244 initially proposed that students take a 100-question civics exam

Required high school civics questions to be added to current U.S. history exam

LUFKIN, Texas (KTRE) - This fall, students will answer 10 civics questions that will be added to the end-of-course U.S. history exam.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott recently signed House Bill 1244 into law. It was authored by State Representative Trent Ashby, R-Lufkin

House Bill 1244 initially proposed that students take a civics exam of about 100 questions in place of the United States history end-of-course assessment. Instead, they went with a lighter load.

“It will add 10 questions to the current U.S. history end-of-course exam. Those questions will be taken from the United States Citizenship Exam,” said Rep. Trent Ashby, R-Lufkin. “I’m very proud of what House Bill 1244 does. It encourages greater civics knowledge and American history knowledge of our graduating seniors.”

State Board of Education Representative Keven Ellis said he’s glad the senate found a compromise in this bill, and it’s not all citizenship questions.

Ellis said the citizenship test is straight forward, unlike the end-of-course exam in U.S. history, which requires critical thinking.

“For example how did the assassination of Martin Luther King or Brown v. Board of Education decision have to do with the Civil Rights Movement, how it affected that. So those are much higher-level critical thinking than just how many senators do we have,” Ellis said.

The new law requires the Texas Education Agency to present an annual report of which questions were asked and the answers given.

The report must also include student performance by district and campus.

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