Caddo Lake residents deal with rising water from recent rainfall

Caddo Lake’s water level starts at Lake O’ the Pines spillway, which is running at capacity

Caddo Lake residents deal with rising water from recent rainfall

HARRISON COUNTY, Texas (KLTV) - All the recent rainfall has to go somewhere, and right now it’s going through Caddo Lake which is nearly eight feet above normal according to Lakes Online, and Caddo residents say flooding seems to happen more often than it used to.

Caddo Lake’s water level starts at the Lake O’ the Pines spillway, which is running at capacity.

It’s not as high as it was in 2016, but it’s still causing problems for people who live on Caddo Lake like Gary Summers.

“I’ve got water three feet deep in my shop and I’m going to guess probably eight or $10,000 worth of damage this time. Last time it was over 150,000,” Summers said.

Caddo resident Gary Summers stand in waist-deep water in his shed. (Jamey Boyum/KLTV Multimedia Journalist)
Caddo resident Gary Summers stand in waist-deep water in his shed. (Jamey Boyum/KLTV Multimedia Journalist)

He says he’s sick of the floods.

“People can argue with me and everything but we’ve got five dams on the Red River below Shreveport, and I think that’s one thing because they can’t get rid of water out of Shreveport. That’s the reason Shreveport keeps flooding all the time,” Summers stated.

He thinks Caddo is stuck between a dam and a wet place.

“Then we got Lake O’ the Pines that holds water back, and if they would dump some of the water in the winter time, and get it low so in the spring they could hold a bunch of water back,” Summers said.

But predicting spring rain a half a year out isn’t highly accurate. Summers says the floods have increased in recent years.

“The floods are getting like I’ve seen it go for like twenty years without a flood and now we’re having one once or twice a year. It’s ridiculous, you know?” Summers said.

“They can say what they want to but I’ve been all the way down the Red River in my boat; all the way to Morgan City. There’s hardly any barge traffic on it. And you go twenty-five miles below Shreveport, lock five; they’ll lock you down at least 22 foot there. So that’s the difference in elevation twenty-five miles south of Shreveport. So I think a lot of this is man-made stuff that’s causing these problems,” Summers said.

Summers and other residents say the water level is dropping, but not fast enough for them.

Residents say the water should continue to drop over the next two weeks, but with more rain in the forecast, it could take longer to get back to normal levels. Summers can’t afford flood insurance since his house isn’t at the right height.

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