East Texas schools among worst for air pollution, according to EPA tracking - KLTV.com - Tyler, Longview, Jacksonville |ETX News

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East Texas schools among worst for air pollution, according to EPA tracking

A new report is promising you a look at just how dangerous the air is that your child breathes at school all day long.

USA Today used an EPA model to track the path of industrial pollution to map out the locations of almost 128,000 schools to determine the levels of toxic chemicals outside. Many East Texas schools ranked pretty high, meaning they had a high level of toxicity. Some schools in Gregg County scored very poorly. Here's a brief look at the schools in the bottom three percentiles.

In the third percentile, you can see Longview High School and Pine Tree Intermediate and Junior High schools as a reference point. There are a little more than 2,000 schools in the study with worse air.

In the second percentile, schools such as Foster Middle School and Ware elementary. Just over one thousand schools have worse air than these schools.

Only one Gregg County school showed up in the first percentile list. Pinewood Park - that's a school on West Glenn Drive in Longview - a school being attended now by Hudson Pep students while their new school is built. Only 421 schools across the nation have worse air qualities.

There is a lot of other information about each school in the study. For example, at Pinewood Park, 93% of overall toxicity is from manganese and manganese compounds - and the major polluters responsible for toxics outside of that particular school include Letourneau Inc., Eastman Chemical Company, and Dana Corp.

Late this afternoon we asked an official with Longview School District if they consider air quality a problem.

"We have never heard of incidents where kids have been sick or anything like that from this so i'm sure we'll get with these corporations in the next day or so and find out what their actual experts in this area are saying," said Brian Bowman.

For more information on the study and to look up you or your child's school, click here to visit The Smokestack Effect.

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