Longview Fire Department rescues man from scaffolding 40 feet up - KLTV.com - Tyler, Longview, Jacksonville |ETX News

Longview Fire Department rescues man from scaffolding 40 feet up

First Responders lower an incapacitated man down a forty foot ladder. Photo by Jamey Boyum KLTV. First Responders lower an incapacitated man down a forty foot ladder. Photo by Jamey Boyum KLTV.
LONGVIEW, TX (KLTV) -

Longview firefighters were called to rescue a man who experienced chest pain while about three stories up on scaffolding.

It happened at the Gregg County Courthouse in downtown Longview around 9 a.m. Tuesday.

The Longview Fire Department says this is not a typical call, but they do train for this kind of rescue.

Longview Fire Marshal Kevin May says first responders arrived at the courthouse to help the man on the scaffolding minutes after the initial call.

“One of our fire engines happened to be really close, so they were on scene pretty quick,” May stated.

Several paramedics climbed the scaffolding to get to the victim.

“A 24-year-old male was having chest pain, and he was about 40 feet in the air on a scaffolding dong some remodeling work,” May said.

A ladder truck was called in but there was an issue.

“They were unable to get a ladder truck up there to him,” May stated.

In the meantime paramedics reached him. 

“They started assessing him and realized he was not able to get down the ladder by himself,” May said.

They called in for a longer ladder.

“A typical extension ladder is usually about 24 feet, so they had to get up higher than that because they said he was about 40 feet in the air,” May relayed.

Not long after the ladder was in place:

“They managed to get him into a Stokes Basket; secured him into it, and we had a team of firefighters up on top of the ladder with him and we also had a team at the bottom of the ladder. And they worked together to lower him down the ladder using a system of ropes and pulleys” May said.

It was another case of slow and steady wins the race.

“When it comes to ladders and rope uses and pulleys and block and tackle, they’re the best in East Texas,” May added.

And it certainly shows that when firefighters aren’t putting out a fire or rescuing people, they are training for just that.

May says it was a textbook rescue, and went off without a hitch. The man was later released from the hospital and went home to Dallas. The scaffolding had been put in place to do sealant work on the courthouse.

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