Airport fire crew speaks about emergency landing - KLTV.com - Tyler, Longview, Jacksonville |ETX News

Airport fire crew speaks about emergency landing

Captain Bruce Hill works a 24 hours on 48 hours off shift at the airport. He's been with the fire department since 1998. (Source: KLTV) Captain Bruce Hill works a 24 hours on 48 hours off shift at the airport. He's been with the fire department since 1998. (Source: KLTV)
The engines that service the airport are equipped with special nozzles that spray water, foam and dry chemicals. (Source: KLTV) The engines that service the airport are equipped with special nozzles that spray water, foam and dry chemicals. (Source: KLTV)
Fire station #3 is crewed by two people at all times, and more personnel back up the station during serious situations. (Source: KLTV) Fire station #3 is crewed by two people at all times, and more personnel back up the station during serious situations. (Source: KLTV)
Monday's emergency landing ended without any injuries. (Source: KLTV) Monday's emergency landing ended without any injuries. (Source: KLTV)
TYLER, TX (KLTV) -

It's been three days since malfunctioning landing gear forced an airplane into an emergency landing at the Tyler Pounds Regional Airport. There were no injuries, and the incident is still under investigation.

Thursday, the airport fire crew that worked the landing was back at work.

"That day [the tower] called and told us they had a Piper Cheyenne with landing gear problems," Captain Bruce Hill said. "As soon as they said landing gear, we bumped into an alert two."

That level of alert meant backup would come from in town. Extra engines, personnel and leadership came to the airport as the twin engine aircraft continued to circle the scene burning off fuel.

Related: 'Calm, methodical' pilot did an excellent job during emergency landing, official says

"Then we waited," Hill said. "He came by with another fly by to show us that his belly was clean, we checked to make sure all his doors were closed and everything was upright like it's supposed to be."

When the pilot landed, he came down on the bottom of the plane. It skidded for several hundred yards as the crews drove behind it with one of the station's E-1 trucks.

"The transmission is set up to where we can flow water and [drive] at the same time," Hill said.

It's equipped with a 1500 gallon water tank, 130 gallons of AFFF foam that suppresses fuel vapors, and 500 pounds of dry chemicals. And unlike traditional fire engines, it's painted a bright green.

"We're here for the what ifs," Hill said. "And that day was one of those."

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