Whitehouse woman seeks rocks painted by late husband - KLTV.com - Tyler, Longview, Jacksonville |ETX News

Whitehouse woman seeks rocks painted by late husband

Alligator rock painted by Robbin Clark's late husband. This rock was hidden at the Whitehouse Brookshires near the helicopter ride. Alligator rock painted by Robbin Clark's late husband. This rock was hidden at the Whitehouse Brookshires near the helicopter ride.
Duck painted rock, painted by Robbin Clark's late husband this rock was hidden at Whitehouse park on top of the grey steps. Duck painted rock, painted by Robbin Clark's late husband this rock was hidden at Whitehouse park on top of the grey steps.
Robbin Clark searching for rocks painted by her late husband. (Source: KLTV) Robbin Clark searching for rocks painted by her late husband. (Source: KLTV)
WHITEHOUSE, TX (KLTV) -

You paint a rock, then hide it for others to find. That’s the new game sweeping across East Texas. 

For Robbin Clark, it’s her one shot at getting a piece of her husband back.

"A couple weeks ago, me and my husband painted rocks," says Clark. "So I thought, 'let's mark them and let's just plant them in Whitehouse.'"

Last Monday, Robbin and Murray Clark, along with their grandchildren, hid two painted rocks, one painted as an alligator, the other a duck.

"At Brookshires we hid the alligator, near the helicopter out front, and in Whitehouse park, there are gray steps that go up very high, we put the duck on the very top step," says Clark. 

Last Friday, just four days later, Murray died in a crash while on his way to work. Robbin said that after the crash, she thought about those rocks, the last thing her husband touched. 

Now she’s begging for them back.

"All of this has hit our grandsons so hard, so it's very important I find the rocks," says Clark. "I'm letting them know that I am looking for them, I got them viral. I said 'I’m going to find them two rocks because that’s all I can do.'"

As she sat in the Whitehouse McDonald's today, a place where she and Murray were regulars, she admired the rocks they hadn't hidden, and continued to hope that someone will return the others to her.

“If I could get these rocks back it would mean we have a part of him; it’s a dedication to his grandchildren,” says Clark.

If you think you know where these painted rocks are message Robbin Clark on Facebook

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