Work finished on sewer main that spilled wastewater into Tyler c - KLTV.com - Tyler, Longview, Jacksonville |ETX News

Work finished on sewer main that spilled wastewater into Tyler creek

The 42" diameter sewer main runs beneath Loop 323. (Source: KLTV) The 42" diameter sewer main runs beneath Loop 323. (Source: KLTV)
Crews lubricated the liner with canola oil while situating it into the main. (Source: KLTV) Crews lubricated the liner with canola oil while situating it into the main. (Source: KLTV)
Once the main is lined, sewage will be routed back through. Then temporary pipes that handle the flow now will be packed up. (Source: KLTV) Once the main is lined, sewage will be routed back through. Then temporary pipes that handle the flow now will be packed up. (Source: KLTV)
TYLER, TX (KLTV) -

Work is finished on a broken sewer main that spilled 100,000 gallons of wastewater into a Tyler creek.

The problem started when part of a TxDOT culvert collapsed onto a sewer main at the intersection of Loop 323 and Texas College Road.

Crews patched the damage, but before they could complete a full repair, a large rain event caused the patched pipe to overflow. This resulted in the spill, which Texas Parks and Wildlife says didn't harm any wildlife because a majority of the wastewater was rainwater.

But after the repair was complete, crews identified a different problem.

"We found that there was some deterioration on the sewer line," Interim Tyler Water Utilities Director Gordon Mayer said.

While it wasn't going to compromise the pipe anytime soon, Mayer says the department decided to line the pipe as a precaution.

"It's a fiberglass resin," he said. "And it should last for twenty years."

The procedure is non-invasive and crews do not have to tear the road to reach the pipe.

To get the liner in place, they lubricate the material and settle it into the pipe, then pump the material against the pipe walls with steam, which also hardens the resin into place. The finished product is an interior shell that prevents any further damage to the actual pipe.

"We'll probably be there the rest of the week to get everything picked up," Mayer said. "Then we'll be out of there."

Once the resin cures, they'll route the sewage away from the temporary infrastructure, then through the main again. Then they pick up the gear and equipment and move on.

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