Broken teeth and cavities: The not so 'sweet' side of Easter candy

Broken teeth and cavities: The not so 'sweet' side of Easter candy
Chewy candy could pull-out existing dental work, Gillespie said. (Source: KLTV News Staff)
Chewy candy could pull-out existing dental work, Gillespie said. (Source: KLTV News Staff)
Easter and Halloween, Gillespie said, are the two of the busiest times of year for his dental office. (Source: KLTV News Staff)
Easter and Halloween, Gillespie said, are the two of the busiest times of year for his dental office. (Source: KLTV News Staff)

TYLER, TX (KLTV) - A warning from an East Texas dentist before filling-up those Easter eggs and baskets.

The National Confectioners Association expects Easter candy sales to exceed $2 billion as nearly 100 million chocolate bunnies and approximately 16 billion jelly beans are are sold. That data, however, does come with a warning from one East Texas dentist.

"Biting down into those hard candies, nine times out of ten, you know the candy is going to break but it's that one time that the tooth breaks where you have an issue," Dr. Matt Gillespie of Azalea Dental in Tyler said.

He added that moderation is key when it comes to eating candy. Gillespie advises brushing and flossing right after eating will clear away acid that could damage teeth. He said gummy candy can also pull-out crowns or fillings. Gillespie said if you feel a stinging sensation in a tooth after eating candy, you could have a cavity or crack developing.

"If you're getting eating a lot of candy and you have a sensitivity where it feels like a tingling in between the teeth that usually means there's a hole in the tooth and you've got a cavity forming underneath there," Gillespie said.
 
He added that leaving a broken tooth untreated could also lead to other problems: some more painful and expensive to repair.

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