The Texas History List: Sam Houston 'gets religion;' plus the JF - KLTV.com - Tyler, Longview, Jacksonville |ETX News

The Texas History List: Sam Houston 'gets religion;' plus the JFK assassination

Sam Houston (Mathew Brady - U.S. National Archives and Records Administration) Sam Houston (Mathew Brady - U.S. National Archives and Records Administration)
Kennedy assassination (Walt Cisco, Dallas Morning News - JFK-Motorcadee.gif, Penn Jones Photographs. Baylor University Collections of Political Materials. Waco, Texas.) Kennedy assassination (Walt Cisco, Dallas Morning News - JFK-Motorcadee.gif, Penn Jones Photographs. Baylor University Collections of Political Materials. Waco, Texas.)

This week in Texas history is filled with events, large and small, that will never be forgotten. Read more to find out about Sam Houston, President Kennedy's assassination, and a town called Thin Gravy, courtesy of the Texas State Historical Association online archives. Click on any link to visit their site to learn even more!

On November 19, 1854, Texas hero Sam Houston joined Independence Baptist Church and was baptized in nearby Little Rocky Creek by Rufus C. Burleson. Houston joined at the urging of his wife, Margaret Moffette Lea Houston, and her mother, Nancy Moffette Lea. A deeply religious woman, Margaret Houston worked hard to restrain Houston's drinking and to lead him to a more settled and devout life.

On November 16, 1845, the Republic of Texas concluded its last Indian treaty. The agreement marked the end of the Tehuacana Creek Councils, which began in the spring of 1843, when Jesse Chisholm helped convince a number of Indian groups, including the Caddos, Tawakonis, Delawares, Lipan Apaches, and Tonkawas, to meet on Tehuacana Creek near the Torrey Brothers trading post south of present Waco.

On November 16,1980, Jess Sweeten, colorful county sheriff and mayor of Athens, Texas, died. He was born in Stigler, Indian Territory, in 1905.  In 1932 his election as sheriff of Henderson County made him the youngest sheriff in Texas. He served for twenty-two years. The six-foot-four, 225-pound Sweeten gained a reputation as a hard-nosed investigator and a crack shot. During his tenure he shot nine men, killing three, including Gerald Johnson, the so-called "Dallas Kid," whom Sweeten gunned down after a high-speed car chase through Athens.

On November 21, 1945, national media attention was focused on the small community of Truman, in eastern Dallas County. The town was previously known by the names Thin Gravy, Deanville, and Mesquite Tap. In 1945 its 200 residents voted to adopt the name of new president Harry S. Truman. On November 21, a sign on Hwy 80 was christened with a bottle of milk, and a letter of congratulations from President Truman was read. The Truman community was absorbed by neighboring Mesquite in the 1950s.

And on November 22, 1963, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas. After breakfast in Fort Worth he flew to Dallas and, with his wife and Governor and Mrs. John Connally, began a motorcade trip in an open car toward downtown Dallas. As the car passed through Dealy Plaza, several shots rang out, hitting both the president and the governor. Kennedy died at 1 p.m. at Parkland Hospital.

More history from the week November 16-22:



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