Tyler dog trainer explains how to keep your dog calm during July - KLTV.com-Tyler, Longview, Jacksonville, Texas | ETX News

Tyler dog trainer explains how to keep your dog calm during July 4 celebrations

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Dog experts say firework shows can be a terrifying experience for dogs.(Source KLTV Staff) Dog experts say firework shows can be a terrifying experience for dogs.(Source KLTV Staff)
As we turn our eyes to the skies to enjoy Fourth of July celebrations, man's best friend won't be as excited. (Source KLTV Staff) As we turn our eyes to the skies to enjoy Fourth of July celebrations, man's best friend won't be as excited. (Source KLTV Staff)
The safest bet is to leave your dog at home, in room with few valuable items. (Source KLTV Staff) The safest bet is to leave your dog at home, in room with few valuable items. (Source KLTV Staff)
TYLER, TX (KLTV) -

As we turn our eyes to the skies to enjoy July 4 celebrations, keep in mind man's best friend won't be as excited.

"They're not seeing what is going on as a holiday, they just see chaos," said Larry Archer, professional dog trainer.

Dog experts say firework shows can be a terrifying experience for dogs.

"Dogs aren't naturally an animal that likes loud noises. They live the whole year without them,” Archer said.

Archer has been a professional dog trainer for 40 years, and he says during firework shows, most dogs will bark uncontrollably and some may even run away.

"They are insecure at this point," Archer said.

Yvette Fisher says her family shoots fireworks more than twice a year, and her six-year-old chocolate lab Gracie Ray has gotten used to them.

"She'll go out in the yard once they go in the air, and then she comes back," Fisher said.

Some pet owners aren't so lucky.

"I'm watching a dog for someone right now that is a new dog for them. Their dog ran away on January 1, New Year's Eve, never to be seen again. It happens," Archer said.

Archer suggests to get your dog ready for the holiday, not to coddle them, but prepare them for what's to come.

"You want to command them to sit beside you, stroke them, but try not to highlight the situation," Archer said.

Since fireworks will be displayed throughout the weekend, Archer says you can even ease your dog into the holiday.

"Have your dog out and about and see how he reacts," Archer said.

Archer says the safest bet is to leave your dog at home, in a room with few valuable items in case the animal gets agitated.

To help your pet cope with the situation, experts say turning on the television may calm them down.

Officials with Pets Fur People say to make sure all of your pets have the appropriate tags. If they do run off you have a better chance of finding them when they are tagged appropriately.

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