ETMC among first hospitals to offer new way to treat common form - KLTV.com-Tyler, Longview, Jacksonville, Texas | ETX News

ETMC among first hospitals to offer new way to treat common form of atrial fibrillation

Posted: Updated:
  • Latest Health NewsThe Latest from HealthDayMore>>

  • Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
  • Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
  • A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.More >>
    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.More >>
  • HealthMore>>

  • People seek out health info when famous person dies

    People seek out health info when famous person dies

    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
  • Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
  • Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
From the East Texas Medical Center

TYLER, TX - Physicians at the ETMC Cardiovascular Institute are among the first in the U.S. to treat paroxysmal atrial fibrillation patients with the new Medtronic Arctic Front Advance ™ Cardiac Cryoballoon System and FlexCath Advance™ Steerable Sheath.

Building upon the proven safety and efficacy of the original system, Medtronic’s second-generation technology provides an efficient approach to treating this common, yet serious, heart rhythm condition that affects approximately three million Americans.

Tyler Cardiovascular Consultants, P.A. working with ETMC are the first to bring this technology to East Texas.

The Arctic Front Advance System is used in minimally invasive procedures to isolate the pulmonary veins using coolant. Delivered via a catheter, the cryoballoon technology is associated with faster procedure times than point-by-point radiofrequency ablation and better treatment outcomes than drug therapies on the market. Additionally, the Arctic Front Advance cryoballoon features the new EvenCool™ Cryo Technology, which optimizes the delivery of coolant inside the balloon; the larger, more uniform cold surface reduces the effort needed to isolate the pulmonary veins, and improves physicians’ ability to treat patients with complicated anatomies as compared to the original cryoballoon.

“This next-generation cryoballoon technology provides the same high-caliber, clinically validated features of its predecessor, while offering the benefits of greater treatment efficiency,” said Dr. Raul Torres with Tyler Cardiovascular Consultants. “By treating patients with the most advanced, clinically relevant technology, we are better equipped to successfully manage their atrial fibrillation, thereby improving their overall quality-of-life.”

The FlexCath Advance Steerable Sheath has a deflection of 135 degrees, compared to the 90 degree deflection rate of its first-generation predecessor. This greater degree of deflection may allow the cryoballoon to be better maneuvered and positioned within the heart to achieve maximum treatment benefit.

The Arctic Front Advance Cryoballoon System and its predecessor have been used to treat more than 50,000 patients in 32 countries.

Atrial fibrillation is the most common and one of the most undertreated heart rhythm disorders. It is estimated that half of all diagnosed atrial fibrillation patients fail drug therapy and if left untreated, patients have up to a five times higher risk of stroke and an increased chance of developing heart failure. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation occurs when irregular heartbeats in the upper chambers start and stop suddenly on their own, usually for minutes or days at a time.

Powered by WorldNow

West Ferguson Street
Tyler, TX 75702

FCC Public File
publicfile@kltv.com
903-597-5588
EEO Report
Closed Captioning

All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Worldnow and KLTV. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.