Ole Miss QB's re-injury risk lowered with new device - KLTV.com-Tyler, Longview, Jacksonville, Texas | ETX News

Ole Miss QB's re-injury risk lowered with new device

Posted: Updated:
Ole Miss quarterback Bo Wallace is now in rehab after undergoing an innovative procedure developed for athletes in contact sports. Ole Miss quarterback Bo Wallace is now in rehab after undergoing an innovative procedure developed for athletes in contact sports.
Dr. William Geissler is Wallace's orthopedic surgeon at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Dr. William Geissler is Wallace's orthopedic surgeon at the University of Mississippi Medical Center.
Ole Miss quarterback Bo Wallace played through the majority of the last season with a separated shoulder. Ole Miss quarterback Bo Wallace played through the majority of the last season with a separated shoulder.
  • HealthMore>>

  • FDA to propose e-cigarette regulations

    FDA to propose e-cigarette regulations

    © FDA© FDA
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is proposing long-awaited regulations governing the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.More >>
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is proposing long-awaited regulations governing the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.More >>
  • People seek out health info when famous person dies

    People seek out health info when famous person dies

    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
  • 1 in 13 U.S. schoolkids takes psych meds

    1 in 13 U.S. schoolkids takes psych meds

    More than 7 percent of American schoolchildren are taking at least one medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties, a new government report shows.More >>
    More than 7 percent of American schoolchildren are taking at least one medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties, a new government report shows.More >>
OXFORD, MS (Mississippi News Now) -

Ole Miss quarterback Bo Wallace played through the majority of the last season with a separated shoulder. So, you can imagine the damage doctors found, not to mention the pain Bo felt.

"Sunday mornings were rough. Saturday nights were really rough," Wallace explained. 

Rough, meaning indescribable pain.

Dr. William Geissler is Wallace's orthopedic surgeon at the University of Mississippi Medical Center.

"Basically the shoulder is hanging down and that's the gap he had prior to the surgery with these ligaments torn between these two bones," said Dr. Geissler. "Taking hits on that is quite painful."

But Bo was determined to keep playing.

"It hurt during the week but during the game, you had so much adrenaline going," said Wallace. "You're playing in front of 92,000 at LSU and it's not going to hurt too much."

Bo is now in rehab after undergoing an innovative procedure developed for athletes in contact sports. It's called the Lockdown, and it's designed to lower his risk of re-injury, according to Dr. Geissler.

"This is a way to hold his clavicle down but we also reconstructed his ligaments," said Geissler. "So once his ligaments heal, hopefully it's good for the rest of his life."

Dr. Geissler performed the surgery Jan. 8 at UMMC. He points to his X-ray over two months later.

"You can see the screw that's here that is helping hold that device around his collar bone," said Geissler. "It's holding it down while the ligaments reconstructed will heal. We don't see any elevation."

Ole Miss Head Football Athletic Trainer, Coach Pat Jernigan, is overseeing Bo's rehab twice a day, five times a week. He says Bo is showing both commitment and patience.

"He's a competitor," said Coach Jernigan. "If you watch what he did through the season he's a natural competitor. You can tell football's important to him. Someone who loves football is the best patient."

Even if being the best patient has been a struggle at times.

"Just having to keep your mind strong through the whole thing," said Wallace. "There are times when you know, when you first have the surgery, you're just like man will I ever be the same."

"If I can get this shoulder better and be in there with Coach Warner and study film with him while I'm doing this, I think I'll come back just as good as I would have been without the surgery,"Wallace added.

Bo says he hasn't thrown a football since his surgery and probably won't until summer. But he's confident he will be 100 percent this fall.

Copyright 2013 MSNewsNow. All rights reserved.

SIDEBAR: Ole Miss QB Bo Wallace

Updated:

Ole Miss Quarterback More>>

Powered by WorldNow

West Ferguson Street
Tyler, TX 75702

FCC Public File
publicfile@kltv.com
903-597-5588
EEO Report
Closed Captioning

All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Worldnow and KLTV. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.