New tool allows easier access to lung lesions - KLTV.com-Tyler, Longview, Jacksonville, Texas | ETX News

New tool allows easier access to lung lesions

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ETMC Tyler recently acquired a new tool called Electromagnetic Navigation Bronchoscopy (ENB) to help in the early detection of lung cancer and other lung diseases.

"The ENB procedure offers patients a less-invasive option to locate, biopsy, and leave behind markers for a lesion deep in the lung," said Todd Sigmon, vice president of the ETMC Cancer Institute. "One in 500 chest x-rays show a peripheral lesion, but traditional bronchoscopy often can't reach these areas which can mean more invasive diagnostic techniques for the patient.  Over two-thirds of the lung is not accessible through standard bronchoscopy."

The superDimension i-Logic System uses GPS-like technology with a catheter-based system that uses the patient's natural airways to access lesions that were previously hard to reach.

"Before the ENB, typical options for a patient with a lesion would be surgery to remove a section of the lung, CT-guided needle biopsy, or watchful waiting," Sigmon said. "This new tool allows us to find the lesion in an outpatient setting with a minimally-invasive procedure that is safe and has fewer complications than an invasive surgical procedure or CT-guided procedures."

Studies show that lung lesions diagnosed early in stage I result in a survival rate of 49 percent at 5 years compared to lung cancer patients diagnosed at stage III or IV where survival rates are 5 percent at five years.

As many as 220,520 men and women in the U.S. were diagnosed and 157,300 died of lung cancer in 2010. Tobacco smoke causes 9 out of 10 cases of lung cancer.  Lung cancer kills more than breast, colon, pancreas, and prostate cancer combined each year.

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