Terms of War - KLTV.com - Tyler, Longview, Jacksonville |ETX News

03/28/03

Terms of War

(Courtesy CNN/Jane's Defence Weekly)

"Regular" Iraqi Army

I Corps
Based:
Around Kirkuk
Personnel: 10,000 authorized per division
Units: 5th Mechanized Division, 2nd Infantry Division, 8th Infantry Division and 38th Infantry Division.
Weapons: Armored units rely on T-54/-55/-62 battle tanks; mechanized battalions use a variety of armored personnel carriers. The military has up to 60 attack helicopters, including Mi-25 Hind, SA-316/-319 Alouette III and SA-342 Gazelle attack helicopters, though how many are operational is unknown.
Duties: Along with the Republican Guard, I Corps guards the northern portions of Iraq near the northern "no-fly" zone.

II Corps
Based:
Northeast of Baghdad
Personnel: 10,000 authorized per division
Units: 3rd Armored Division, and 15th and 34th infantry divisions.
Weapons: Armored units rely on T-54/-55/-62 battle tanks; mechanized
battalions use a variety of armored personnel carriers. The military has up to 60 attack helicopters, including Mi-25 Hind, SA-316/-319 Alouette III and SA-342 Gazelle attack helicopters, though how many are operational is unknown.
Duties: II Corps guards the border with Iran northeast of Baghdad.

III Corps
Based:
Southern Iraq
Personnel: 10,000 authorized per division
Units: 6th Armored Division, 51st Mechanized Division and 15th Infantry Division.
Weapons: Armored units rely on T-54/-55/-62 battle tanks; mechanized battalions use a variety of armored personnel carriers. The military has up to 60 attack helicopters, including Mi-25 Hind, SA-316/-319 Alouette III and SA-342 Gazelle attack helicopters, though how many are operational is unknown.
Duties: III Corps protects the route along the Euphrates River that leads to Kuwait through the southern city of Basra.

IV Corps
Based:
Northeast of Baghdad
Personnel: 10,000 authorized per division
Units: 10th Armored Division, and 14th and 18th infantry divisions.
Weapons: Armored units rely on T-54/-55/-62 battle tanks; mechanized battalions use a variety of armored personnel carriers. The military has up to 60 attack helicopters, including Mi-25 Hind, SA-316/-319 Alouette III and SA-342 Gazelle attack helicopters, though how many are operational is unknown.
Duties: IV Corps guards the southern end of the border with Iran.

V Corps
Based:
Around Mosul in northern Iraq.
Personnel: 10,000 authorized per division
Units: 1st Mechanized Division, and 4th, 7th and 16th infantry divisions.
Weapons: Armored units rely on T-54/-55/-62 battle tanks; mechanized battalions use a variety of armored personnel carriers. The military has up to 60 attack helicopters, including Mi-25 Hind, SA-316/-319 Alouette III and SA-342 Gazelle attack helicopters, though how many are operational is unknown.
Duties: V Corps guards the northern part of the country.


Republican Guard:

The Republican Guard is equipped with Iraq's most modern weapons and has an estimated 80,000 soldiers divided into two corps. The guard, however, is not allowed in Baghdad but is posted on its outskirts to defend the approaches of Iraq's capital. The guard is supervised by Qusay Hussein, Saddam Hussein's youngest son, and its chief of staff is Staff Gen. Ibraheem Abdul Sattar Muhammad al Tikriti.

Northern Corps
Based:
Around northern Baghdad and Tikrit
Strength: 10,000 to 15,000 soldiers authorized per division
Units: Medina Armored Division, Adnan Mechanized Division, and Nebuchadnezzar Infantry Division.
Weapons: T-72 battle tanks, self-propelled artillery, BMP fighting vehicles, anti-tank missiles, and anti-tank and infantry-support guns.
Duties: The Northern Corps guards Baghdad and its northern approaches along with Tikrit, Saddam's birthplace.

Southern Corps
Based:
Southern Baghdad
Strength: 10,000 to 15,000 soldiers authorized per division
Units: Al Nida Armored Division, Hammurabi Armored Division and Baghdad Infantry Division.
Weapons: T-72 battle tanks, self-propelled artillery, BMP fighting vehicles and anti-tank missiles.
Duties: The Republican Guard's Southern Corps guards Baghdad and its southern approaches.

Special Republican Guard:

Based: Baghdad
Personnel: 15,000
Units: Four infantry brigades, an armored unit and an air defense unit.
Weapons: Armored units operate T-72 battle tanks.
Duties: The elite SRG is the only significant military unit allowed inside Baghdad, and nearly all of its members are from Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's al-Bu Nasir tribe. The SRG's 1st Brigade provides security for Saddam, and the 2nd Brigade protects presidential palaces and the northern approaches to Baghdad. The 3rd and 4th brigades defend palaces and the southern approaches to Baghdad, and are organized as full combat units capable of mounting counterattacks. The armored unit consists of two tank regiments.

Special Units:

Unit 999
Based:
Salman army base southeast of Baghdad
Units: Six battalions of 300 men each. Each battalion specializes in a particular skill or focuses on relations with a neighboring country.
Duties: The 1st (Persian) battalion specializes in Iran; the 2nd (Saudi Arabia) Battalion handles Iraq's neighbor to the south; the 3rd (Palestine) Battalion deals with Israel; the 4th (Turkish) Battalion specializes in Turkey; the 5th (Marine) Battalion specializes in maritime operations such as mining waterways between Iran and Iraq. The "Opposition" Battalion is divided into a section focusing on dissident Kurds in the north and a section focusing on dissident Shiite Iraqis in the south.
Military Security Service
Based:
Baghdad
Personnel: 5,000
Duties: This independent agency monitors Iraq's armed forces for signs of dissent. MSS personnel are assigned to all levels of every unit in the armed forces. It also has an independent, rapid-intervention military brigade.

People's Army
Iraq has 19 units organized by geographical region known as the People's Army, or Popular Army. The civilian volunteers receive only a few weeks of training before they are mobilized. The People's Army was not effective against Iran or in the Persian Gulf War, and is not expected to offer much resistance to a U.S.-led ground invasion.

The Fedayeen:

Based: Various locations within Iraq.
Personnel: Up to 25,000
Units: Loosely-organized units, perhaps reporting to one of Saddam Hussein's sons.
Weapons: Various.
Duties: Fedayeen means "those willing to sacrifice themselves for Saddam."  This is a irregular, paramilitary force loyal to Saddam and the ruling Ba'ath Military Party.  They often dress in all-black, or in civilian clothing. They specialize in ambush attacks, and terror.  They have been labeled as "death squads."  They are willing to, and perhaps already have, engaged significantly larger forces.

Coalition of the Willing:   Made up of American, British, and Australian military apparatus.

CentCom: Coaltion Central Command.  This is located in Doha, Qatar.  It is the central receiving point of data, and the primary command center.  Qatar is an allied nation on the Persian Gulf several hundred miles south of Iraq.

Tigris and Euphrates:These are the two rivers of Biblical notoriety, running generally Northwest to Southeast through Iraq.  Baghdad sits directly on the Tigris River.

Apache:  The Apache Helicopter, and Apache Longbow are some of the "crown jewels" of the American military.  They are able to attack swiftly with large weapons, usually Hellfire missiles, bombs, and guns.

Kurds:  A largely Sunni Muslim people with their own language and culture, most Kurds live in the generally contiguous areas of Turkey, Iraq, Iran, Armenia and Syria – a mountainous region of southwest Asia generally known as Kurdistan.  The Iraqi members of this group have been oppressed by the Hussein regime, but have fought fiercely enough to receive a certain amount of self-rule in far Northern Iraq.  Saddam Hussein used chemical weapons against a Kurdish town in the 1980s.

 Al-Jazeera:  An Arabic-language television network established in the 1990s.  Based in Qatar, it broadcasts via satellite, and is seen in much of the Middle East.  It is also available, by subscription, on American DSS satellite systems.  Al-Jazeera has often given the world it's first look at news in the Middle East.  It has also been criticized for airing videotape of Osama Bin Laden, and American POWs and killed servicemen.   The latter tape was supplied by government-run Iraqi TV.

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