On the roof working with melted asphalt. Now, that's a HOT job! - KLTV.com - Tyler, Longview, Jacksonville |ETX News

On the roof working with melted asphalt. Now, that's a HOT job!

By Lakecia Shockley - bio | email
Posted by Ellen Krafve - email

LONGVIEW, TX (KLTV) - It just might be the hottest job of the summer, but we'll let you be the judge. 

Everyday the sun beams down on the heads of East Texas roofers. It's is one the hottest jobs you can have.

"Right here on the roof it gets to probably about 130 degrees," said Juan Artez, the forman for McKinney Roofing. "I've been working 35 years for this company and I'm still here."

Still here in the sweltering East Texas heat, Artez and his crew know what it takes to not pass out.

"I drink a lot of water - cool water!" exclaimed Daniel Abelleneta, who has been a roofer for 12 years. "And, I wear my towel and my hat and that's it."

"If I see somebody that doesn't look like they're going to make it, then I send them to the grounds where they can take another break," said Artez.

And lots of water breaks they do take because, after all, spreading out rocks on a hot roof isn't easy. And, to make it even hotter, they've got a bubbly brew of asphalt.

"This is where we melt the asphalt," explained Artez. "This asphalt is probably about 475 degrees to 500 degrees."

Did I mention, it sticks to your shoe?

"They probably weight about five or six pounds with all the gravel and asphalt they have," said Artez holding up his shoe. "It's probably about five or six pounds."

With a hot job like this roofers can't wait to get home.

"When I get home the first thing I do is...go take a shower and get me a big ice tea and sit down under the air condition," said Artez. 

Abelleneta had some advice for the youngsters who don't want this hot job.

"Well, go to school," he laughed. "That's it. Yep!"

Forman Artez tells us, they've had several want-to-be roofers try out for the job, but the scorching heat is so unbearable, some can't make it past a week.

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